CP Logo

Indiana University of Pennsylvania College Portrait

Home Compare At A Glance Contact

EXPLORE THIS COLLEGE PORTRAIT

Indiana University of Pennsylvania Learning Outcomes

Overview of Student Learning Outcomes Assessment at IUP

 

IUP is a diverse university with a wide variety of academic programs and many parallel institutional systems in place to teach and support students.  As a result, student learning outcomes cannot be gathered using a single assessment instrument or even a single data-collection system.  Our university-wide instruments of assessment are coordinated by the Office of Institutional Research, Planning and Assessment; the Division of Academic Affairs and the Division of Student Affairs.  Individual colleges and programs are responsible for managing student learning outcome assessment for specialized accreditation and for ensuring that program learning goals (competencies) are achieved. 




Indiana University of Pennsylvania administered the CLA in 2014.

Indiana University of Pennsylvania conducted a Value-added administration of the CLA in 2014. The results are displayed below in the SLO Results tab.

For additional information on IUP’s process for administering CLA, please click on the Assessment Process Tab below. For information on the students included in the administration, please click the Students Tested Tab.

Why did you choose the CLA for your institutional assessment?

IUP chose the CLA as part of an on-going assessemnt tool recommended by the University wide assessment committee.


Which Indiana University of Pennsylvania students are assessed? When?

Freshman and Seniors were assessed.   Freshman are tested in Fall of each year and Seniors are tested in Spring


How are assessment data collected?

Information for IUP students is collected by the Office of Instututional Research and is linked to the results of the CLA.


How are data reported within Indiana University of Pennsylvania?

University-wide Collegiate Learning Assessment (CLA)

The Academic Affairs Division administers the Collegiate Learning Assessment (CLA) to approximately 100 first-year students and 100 seniors every year to measure value-added learning relative to peer institutions. The Council for Aid to Education coordinates administration of this nationally benchmarked instrument. Results from the CLA assessment instrument are used to measure critical thinking, analytic reasoning, problem solving and communication skills in separate cohorts of freshmen and seniors.  The three years of CLA data collected so far show that IUP students score in the mid-range of student learning outcomes for peer institutions across the nation.  When their scores are adjusted on the basis of incoming SAT’s and freshmen year CLA results, they achieve or exceed their normal expectations in most cases.  These data indicate that overall learning outcomes achieved by IUP students are at or slightly above what one would expect based on their academic potential. 


How are assessment data at IUP used to guide program improvements?

Program-level Student Learning Outcomes Assessments

Accredited programs at IUP use multiple student learning outcome assessment measures to meet their accreditation standards as required by their specialized accrediting body.  These measures include but are not limited to electronic portfolios (for example, LiveText), student work samples, nationally benchmarked exams and a course-based Key Assessment Ratings System (KARS) for assessing student outcomes in required classes.  Non-accredited academic and student affairs programs at IUP carry out student learning outcomes assessment as part of the PASSHE program review requirements using a variety of survey or test instruments, capstone projects analyzed with rubrics linked to program competencies (learning goals), student exit interviews and alumni and employer surveys.  The strength of program-based assessment is that these instruments are flexible and can be adjusted quickly to assess new issues as they arise.   


Of 2647 freshmen students eligible to be tested, 94 (4%) were included in the tested sample at Indiana University of Pennsylvania.


Of 3244 senior students eligible to be tested, 93 (3%) were included in the tested sample at Indiana University of Pennsylvania.


Probability sampling, where a small randomly selected sample of a larger population can be used to estimate the learning gains in the entire population with statistical confidence, provides the foundation for campus-level student learning outcomes assessment at many institutions. It's important, however, to review the demographics of the tested sample of students to ensure that the proportion of students within a given group in the tested sample is close to the proportion of students in that group in the total population. Differences in proportions don't mean the results aren't valid, but they do mean that institutions need to use caution in interpreting the results for the groups that are under-represented in the tested sample.

Undergraduate Student Demographic Breakdown

  Freshmen Seniors
Eligible Students Tested Students Eligible Students Tested Students
Gender Female 58% 86% 58% 78%
Male 42% 14% 42% 22%
Other or Unknown <1% <1% <1% <1%
Race/
Ethnicity
US Underrepresented Minority 21% 12% 13% 11%
White / Caucasian 78% 83% 82% 81%
International 1% <1% 3% 4%
Unknown 1% 5% 2% 4%
Low-income (Eligible to receive a Federal Pell Grant) 40% 28% 35% 39%

The VSA advises institutions to follow assessment publisher guidelines for determining the appropriate number of students to test. In the absence of publisher guidelines, the VSA provides sample size guidelines for institutions based on a 95% confidence interval and 5% margin of error. So long as the tested sample demographics represent the student body, this means we can be 95% certain that the "true" population learning outcomes are with +/- 5% of the reported results. For more information on Sampling, please refer to the Research Methods Knowledge Base

The increase in learning on the performance task is at or near what would be expected at an institution testing students of similar academic abilities.

The increase in learning on the analytic writing task is at or near what would be expected at an institution testing students of similar academic abilities.

Seniors Detail

The charts below show the proportion of tested seniors who scored at each level of the nine subscales that make up the CLA. The subscale scores range from 1 to 6 with 6 representing a higher or better score. Due to rounding, subscores may not total 100%.


Performance Task Make-an-Argument Critique-an-Argument
Analytic Reasoning and Evaluation
Writing Effectiveness
Writing Mechanics
Problem Solving

Freshmen Detail

The charts below show the proportion of tested freshmen who scored at each level of the nine subscales that make up the CLA. The subscale scores range from 1 to 6 with 6 representing a higher or better score. Due to rounding, subscores may not total 100%.


Performance Task Make-an-Argument Critique-an-Argument
Analytic Reasoning and Evaluation
Writing Effectiveness
Writing Mechanics
Problem Solving