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East Central University Learning Outcomes

Each year, the CAAP exam is used to assess student learning in the areas of critical thinking, mathematics, reading, and writing skills.  ECU students consistently score within the standard deviation from the national norm.  Graduation and retention rates were examined of students who took the CAAP exam.  Results show that approximately 89% of those students examined within the past 3 years either graduated or are still enrolled at ECU.  Furthermore, these data show that students who took the CAAP have developed the academic skills necessary to complete a degree program.




East Central University administered the ACT CAAP in 2009 - 2014.

East Central University conducted a Senior-only benchmarked administration of the ACT CAAP in 2009 - 2014. The results are displayed below in the SLO Results tab.

For additional information on ECU’s process for administering ACT CAAP, please click on the Assessment Process Tab below. For information on the students included in the administration, please click the Students Tested Tab.

Why did you choose the ACT CAAP for your institutional assessment?

ECU began using the Collegiate Assessment of Academic Proficiency (CAAP) exam to provide means to assess student aptitude in specific subject and skills areas central to the general education curriculum. CAAP has been used in UNIV 3001 since 2006-07.Math, Reading, Critical Thinking, and Writing are assessed using the standardized CAAP test. CAAP was chosen as our institutional assessment tool because it is compatible with the other assessments and practices in our assessment culture, particularly with the assessment of our general education program.  This compatibility allows for broader and deeper analysis of the assessment data.


Which East Central University students are assessed? When?

The CAAP exam is administered to all students enrolled in the UNIV 3001 General Education Seminar in the fall, spring, and summer semesters. Although the sample is not random, this sampling procedure ensures that students of all programs are surveyed every five years as determined by the official program review rotation schedule.


How are assessment data collected?

All beginning freshmen who enter ECU with six or fewer semester hours are required to take UNIV 3001, the general education capstone course, after having completed between 45-70 credit hours in the fall, spring, and summer semesters.  Transfer students who have earned 12 or more credit hours elsewhere may petition to be exempt from this course.  As part of this course, students are evaluated using the College Assessment of Academic Proficiency (CAAP) exam to assess general education competencies in critical thinking, mathematics, reading, and writing skills on a formal rotation basis, ensuring that all skills are measured annually.

After the students complete the CAAP, exams are returned to ACT for scoring.


How are data reported within East Central University?

CAAP provides institutional reports and data to participating institutions. Data are aggregated by class level, ethnicity, gender, and age and overall results by outcome: critical thinking, writing skills, mathematics, reading, and science.  Data and results concerning student performance on learning outcomes are shared with faculty, administrators and various committees at ECU, including the University Assessment Committee, Academic Affairs Council, and accreditation committees.  Elements of the data are also shared with the community by posting the Annual Assessment Reports on the Center for Assessment and Institutional Research website. 


How are assessment data at ECU used to guide program improvements?

The results of CAAP are shared with the University Assessment Committee to discuss possible curriculum changes and recommendations for areas of improvement to the General Education program.  The importance of this general education assessment has resulted in the creation of the General Education Committee, a new university standing committee, which will be responsible for 1) establishing guidelines for departments to follow in requesting new courses for the General Education program; 2) review new courses proposed for the General Education program and making recommendations to the Academic Committee; 3) overseeing the General Education program outcomes; 4) overseeing the assessment of the general education curriculum; and 5) completing a program review every five years.


Since ECU senior students complete the CAAP as part of their general education capstone course in the fall, spring, and summer semesters, the sampling procedure is determined by students enrolled in programs scheduled for program reviews during that particular semester.  Transfer students who have earned 12 or more credit hours elsewhere may petition to be exempt from the general education capstone course.  This procedure ensures that students of all programs are surveyed every five years as determined by the official program review rotation schedule.

Our tested senior students included a slightly higher proportion of males than exist in our undergraduate student population.  Overall, the tested sample was representative of our undergraduate student body.

 

The VSA advises institutions to follow assessment publisher guidelines for determining the appropriate number of students to test. In the absence of publisher guidelines, the VSA provides sample size guidelines for institutions based on a 95% confidence interval and 5% margin of error. So long as the tested sample demographics represent the student body, this means we can be 95% certain that the "true" population learning outcomes are with +/- 5% of the reported results. For more information on Sampling, please refer to the Research Methods Knowledge Base

At ECU, senior students who completed the ACT CAAP Critical Thinking test (n=145) scored higher than 53% of seniors at all other CLA-participating institutions in Spring 2009.

At ECU, senior students who completed the ACT CAAP Written Communication test (n=117) scored higher than 52% of seniors at all other CLA-participating institutions in Spring 2009.

As ECU did not participate in a value-added administration, scores are not adjusted to account for the incoming ability of ECU students.

Writing Detail

The charts below show the distribution of student scores on the ACT CAAP Written Communication Test. The ACT CAAP Written Communication Test is scored on a rubric with scores ranging from 1 to 6 at intervals of .5 with 6 representing a higher or better score. Each student’s response is scored by two raters; the ratings distributions for each rater are shown below. The Overall Writing Score is an average of the two ratings

Critical Thinking Detail

The chart below shows the distribution of student scores on the ACT CAAP Critical Thinking Test. Students receive a scaled score between 1 and 80, with 80 representing a higher or better score