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CUNY Lehman College College Portrait

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CUNY Lehman College Learning Outcomes

Assessment of student learning is a well-established and integrated process involving most academic programs across the College. On the departmental level, every degree-granting undergraduate program has well-developed expected learning outcomes, which are mapped to courses in each curricula. Each year, degree programs select one or more of these outcomes and develop detailed plans to asses them. At the conclusion of every year, programs are required to describe any changes that have been implemented or plan to be made as a result of these assessments. All of this information is captured in an online assessment management system that provides real-time access to assessment related information for faculty, deans and administrators. Spearheading assessment-related efforts are over twenty faculty assessment coordinators in each department who work closely with the College’s Office of Assessment and Planning and the Dean’s Offices to ensure that assessment are providing meaningful and actionable information, and that the results are used to improve teaching and learning. The coordinators are responsible for engaging faculty in their respective departments about the assessment process and for ensuring that assessment plans are meaningful and useful. Recent assessments have resulted in substantive changes including: additions of new courses, revised course sequences, changes to course delivery methods, and the creation of new student reference materials. In addition the College’s own assessment processes, it also is worth noting that several programs at Lehman College are subject to external specialized accreditation. These include programs Nursing, Speech-Language Pathology, Dietetics, Social Work and the entire School of Education. In the past three year, all of these programs have been successfully reaccredited by their respective accreditation agencies. The College also recognizes that all learning does not occur in the classroom, so it also requires all support units to develop assessment plans and to report on their assessment findings on an annual basis. This includes units such as the College library, and several offices within the Division of Student Affairs. These programs regularly assess learning in the workshops and programs they offer. The Office of Assessment and Planning, like it does with academic programs, consults with and lends technical expertise to these programs when developing and carrying-out their assessment plans. Recently the College began to better track students post-graduation. Using data from the National Student Clearinghouse and internal records, the College has determined that 35 percent of bachelor degree students have enrolled in graduate school with three years of receiving their baccalaureate degrees and that nearly half (48%) attended post-baccalaureate programs within seven years. While exact employment figures are harder to come by, a majority of students surveyed indicated that they are also working within this same five year time frame. Finally, Lehman College’s General Education program has also been recently modified to adhere to CUNY’s new General Education framework known as Pathways. The new General Education curriculum was implemented in fall 2013 and is intended to make student movement within the CUNY system more efficient and improve time-to completion. Prior to its implementation, transferability problems within the system were common and students frequently earned well over the 120 credits required by baccalaureate programs. The General Education curriculum consists of a six course “Required Core”, six class “Flexible Core” (consisting of courses in five area) and a two course “College Option” (which students take after completing 60 credits). Courses throughout the curriculum have well-articulated learning objectives. The new General Education program was assessed for the first time in 2014 and will be assessed annually moving forward. Additionally,  the Collegiate Learning Assessment (CLA), a value-added, constructed response approach to the assessment of higher-order skills was conducted at Lehman College in the Fall of 2013 and the Spring of 2014.  The entire report can be viewed under Learning Assessment Examples.




CUNY Lehman College administered the CLA+ in Fall 2013 - Spring 2014.

CUNY Lehman College conducted a Value-added administration of the CLA+ in Fall 2013 - Spring 2014. The results are displayed below in the SLO Results tab.

For additional information on Lehman’s process for administering CLA+, please click on the Assessment Process Tab below. For information on the students included in the administration, please click the Students Tested Tab.

Why did you choose the CLA+ for your institutional assessment?

The CLA was chosen by the CUNY administration on the recommendation of the CUNY Task Force on System-Wide Assessment of Undergraduate Learning Gains (assessment task Force) to measure students' higher order learning tasks. 


Which CUNY Lehman College students are assessed? When?

100 Frist time freshmen are recruited from the pool of incoming freshmen.  These students are tested in the Spring semester.  Since this is a longitudinal study, the tested seniors are drawn from a previous cohort of freshmen who are still available and willing to be tested.  The seniors are also tested in the Spring semester.  


How are assessment data collected?

The Lehman College Office of Testing recruits the students to be tested from the pool of first time-freshmen and recruits the seniors from the available and will pool of previously tested freshmen cohort. One section of the test (PT) measures three domains: analysis and problem solving, writing effectiveness, and writing mechanics.  The SRQ section also measures three domains: scientific and quantitative reasoning, critical reading and evaluation, and critiquing an argument.  The first administration of the CLA provides a baseline for freshmen, while the test administered to senior’s measures value added.


How are data reported within CUNY Lehman College?

The CLA provides a very detailed final report with scores and sub-scores for freshmen and seniors, including demographic information to determine the representativeness of the sample. The score and sub-scores for freshmen and seniors are compared to measure value-added across the categories and to determine strengths and weakness in our student population.


How are assessment data at Lehman used to guide program improvements?

 "Writing Across the Curriculum" is indirectly related to the results of the CLA.    The institution believes all courses should have a writing and critical thinking component. The CLA results were shared with the Office of the Associate Provost for Academic Affairs for dissemination to academic departments.


Of 389 freshmen students eligible to be tested, 100 (26%) were included in the tested sample at CUNY Lehman College.


Of 100 senior students eligible to be tested, 60 (60%) were included in the tested sample at CUNY Lehman College.


Probability sampling, where a small randomly selected sample of a larger population can be used to estimate the learning gains in the entire population with statistical confidence, provides the foundation for campus-level student learning outcomes assessment at many institutions. It's important, however, to review the demographics of the tested sample of students to ensure that the proportion of students within a given group in the tested sample is close to the proportion of students in that group in the total population. Differences in proportions don't mean the results aren't valid, but they do mean that institutions need to use caution in interpreting the results for the groups that are under-represented in the tested sample.

Undergraduate Student Demographic Breakdown

  Freshmen Seniors
Eligible Students Tested Students Eligible Students Tested Students
Gender Female 64% 77% 150 57%
Male 36% 20% 106 42%
Other or Unknown <1% <1% <1% <1%
Race/
Ethnicity
US Underrepresented Minority 87% 93% 213 85%
White / Caucasian 8% 3% 23% 2%
International 4% 4% 21% 13%
Unknown <1% <1% <1% <1%
Low-income (Eligible to receive a Federal Pell Grant) <1% <1% <1% <1%

A review of the demographic breakdown of the respondents indicates that the sample was truly representative of the Lehman College population.

The VSA advises institutions to follow assessment publisher guidelines for determining the appropriate number of students to test. In the absence of publisher guidelines, the VSA provides sample size guidelines for institutions based on a 95% confidence interval and 5% margin of error. So long as the tested sample demographics represent the student body, this means we can be 95% certain that the "true" population learning outcomes are with +/- 5% of the reported results. For more information on Sampling, please refer to the Research Methods Knowledge Base

The increase in learning on the performance task is at or near what would be expected at an institution testing students of similar academic abilities.

The increase in learning on the selected-response questions is at or near what would be expected what would be epxected at an institution testing students of similar academic abilities.

Seniors Detail

The charts below show the proportion of tested seniors who scored at each level of the nine subscales that make up the CLA+. The subscale scores range from 1 to 6 with 6 representing a higher or better score. Due to rounding, subscores may not total 100%.

Performance Task
Analysis & Problem Solving
Writing Effectiveness
Writing Mechanics

The table below shows students' mean scores on the three subscales that make up the Selected-Response Questions section of the CLA+. The students subscores are determined by the number of correct responses in each subsection, with those raw numbers adjusted based on the difficulty of the question set the students received. Individual student scores are rounded to the nearest whole number.

Subscale Mean Student Scores
Scientific & Quantitative Reasoning (Range: 200 to 800) 516.0
Critical Reading & Evaluation (Range: 200 to 800) 528.0
Critique an Argument (Range: 200 to 800) 508.0
Freshmen Detail

The charts below show the proportion of tested freshmen who scored at each level of the nine subscales that make up the CLA+. The subscale scores range from 1 to 6 with 6 representing a higher or better score. Due to rounding, subscores may not total 100%.

Performance Task
Analysis & Problem Solving
Writing Effectiveness
Writing Mechanics

The table below shows students' mean scores on the three subscales that make up the Selected-Response Questions section of the CLA+. The students subscores are determined by the number of correct responses in each subsection, with those raw numbers adjusted based on the difficulty of the question set the students received. Individual student scores are rounded to the nearest whole number.

Subscale Mean Student Scores
Scientific & Quantitative Reasoning (Range: 200 to 800) 491.0
Critical Reading & Evaluation (Range: 200 to 800) 491.0
Critique an Argument (Range: 200 to 800) 491.0