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The College at Brockport, State University of New York College Portrait

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The College at Brockport, State University of New York Learning Outcomes

The College at Brockport, SUNY, has a long-standing system for evaluation and quality improvement of academic programs. This system requires assessment of student learning in all major programs and the General Education Program.

All academic major programs have written student learning outcomes that are assessed according to the Academic Assessment System. The system requires student learning outcomes to be assessed (measured) in a three-year cycle during which the complete set of outcomes must be covered. Assessment data are actual products of student work evaluated by faculty and compared to learning goals or benchmarks. A yearly assessment report is required from each program and shared with the Academic Assessment Subcommittee, the faculty, deans, and higher administration. Each report includes action items for further improvement on the particular outcome assessed.

The College’s General Education Program is also systematically assessed using a set of student learning outcomes derived from the SUNY System General Education Program guidelines. Each General Education area outcome is assessed in the departmental courses approved for that area. Reports on General Education assessment are reviewed by the General Education Assessment Committee and the College Senate General Education Committee.

The College requires all major programs to complete a structured, in-depth Periodic Program Review (PPR) encompassing all departmental/major functions on a five-year cycle. The most recent cycle began in 2015-2016. In this current cycle, all academic programs will be given an in-depth review beginning with the preparation of a highly-structured and comprehensive departmental Self-Study that addresses all aspects of department function.  Two external reviewers from peer institutions will examine the Self-Study and carry out an independent review of the department and its programs culminating in a written report to the department, dean, and provost. The department, in consultation with their dean, completes the PPR by implementing a Joint Action Plan that addresses the actions for improvement to be taken by the department and the way the College administration will support those actions.

The College at Brockport, SUNY, is accredited by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education, 3624 Market St., Philadelphia, PA, 19104-2680; (215) 662-5606, and the Board of Regents of the University of the State of New York.

In addition, the following individual undergraduate and/or graduate programs are accredited by other accrediting agencies:

Athletic Training: Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs

Business Administration and Economics: Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB)

Chemistry: American Chemical Society

Computer Science: Computing Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET)

Counselor Education - College Counselor and School Counselor Emphases: Council for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP)

Dance:National Association of Schools of Dance (NASD)

Health Science(Alcohol & Substance Abuse Studies):   National Association of Alcohol and Drug Abuse Counselors (NAADAC)

Nursing: Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE)

Public Administration:National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration (NASPA)

Recreation and Leisure Studies (Undergraduate):National Recreation and Park Association/American Association for Recreation and Leisure (NRPA/AARL)

Social Work:Council on Social Work Education (CSWE)

Teacher Education (All Programs):National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE)

Theatre:National Association of Schools of Theatre (NAST)

Each of the accreditation agencies has its own requirements for assessment of student learning outcomes that must be met to acquire and maintain the accreditation.




The College at Brockport, State University of New York administered the CLA+ in 2014 - 2015.

The College at Brockport, State University of New York conducted a Value-added administration of the CLA+ in 2014 - 2015. The results are displayed below in the SLO Results tab.

For additional information on Brockport’s process for administering CLA+, please click on the Assessment Process Tab below. For information on the students included in the administration, please click the Students Tested Tab.

Why did you choose the CLA+ for your institutional assessment?

The College at Brockport has administered several tests of critical thinking over the years including the California Critical Thinking Skills Test, the CAAP, and the CLA. The CLA seems to be increasingly respected in the assessment field, and the reports are useful and easily understandable.


Which The College at Brockport, State University of New York students are assessed? When?

The administration of the CLA was done using a sample of first-year students and seniors. The CLA will be administered again in the fall semester of the 2018-2019 academic year. There is no need for more frequent administration as our student population and curriculum is fairly stable.


How are assessment data collected?

The Office of Assessment & Testing identified students eligible and willing to participate. This is not an easy task as students are not very interested in additional testing. Testing is done by this office and submitted for analysis.  Reports are received by the office and distributed to the vice provost’s office for review by the Academic Assessment Committee and the College Senate’s General Education Committee.


How are data reported within The College at Brockport, State University of New York?

The CLA results have been expected to help answer two questions: Is our student population performing at levels expected for the institution?  And… Do the data show that there is an increase in performance level between the first-year and senior level?  We would expect that the answer to both questions would be positive, and that was the case with the 2011 CLA administration.  Faculty are currently analyzing the 2014-2015 results.


How are assessment data at Brockport used to guide program improvements?

The CLA results are available to College committees interested in improving the General Education Program especially with respect to developing improved critical thinking skills. The 2011 CLA administration will function as baseline data against which to measure the effect of changes in  curriculum and pedagogy dealing with critical thinking in the General Education Program.  Currently, a faculty general education committee is developing an action plan based on the 2014-2015 results.


Of 375 freshmen students eligible to be tested, 55 (15%) were included in the tested sample at The College at Brockport, State University of New York.


Of 659 senior students eligible to be tested, 100 (15%) were included in the tested sample at The College at Brockport, State University of New York.


Probability sampling, where a small randomly selected sample of a larger population can be used to estimate the learning gains in the entire population with statistical confidence, provides the foundation for campus-level student learning outcomes assessment at many institutions. It's important, however, to review the demographics of the tested sample of students to ensure that the proportion of students within a given group in the tested sample is close to the proportion of students in that group in the total population. Differences in proportions don't mean the results aren't valid, but they do mean that institutions need to use caution in interpreting the results for the groups that are under-represented in the tested sample.

Undergraduate Student Demographic Breakdown

  Freshmen Seniors
Eligible Students Tested Students Eligible Students Tested Students
Gender Female 58% 73% 61% 77%
Male 42% 27% 39% 23%
Other or Unknown <1% <1% <1% <1%
Race/
Ethnicity
US Underrepresented Minority 18% 16% 11% 10%
White / Caucasian 77% 75% 84% 83%
International <1% <1% <1% 1%
Unknown 4% 9% 4% 6%
Low-income (Eligible to receive a Federal Pell Grant) 11% 7% 6% 5%

It is very difficult to acquire a testing population of the required sample size especially for the senior group, and almost impossible to create a truly random sample. Because of this there may be unavoidable errors with respect to representativeness.  It is possible that our method of attracting students for this test drew students that were more motivated than the general population.

The VSA advises institutions to follow assessment publisher guidelines for determining the appropriate number of students to test. In the absence of publisher guidelines, the VSA provides sample size guidelines for institutions based on a 95% confidence interval and 5% margin of error. So long as the tested sample demographics represent the student body, this means we can be 95% certain that the "true" population learning outcomes are with +/- 5% of the reported results. For more information on Sampling, please refer to the Research Methods Knowledge Base

The increase in learning on the performance task is at or near what would be expected at an institution testing students of similar academic abilities.

The increase in learning on the selected-response questions is at or near what would be expected what would be epxected at an institution testing students of similar academic abilities.

Seniors Detail

The charts below show the proportion of tested seniors who scored at each level of the nine subscales that make up the CLA+. The subscale scores range from 1 to 6 with 6 representing a higher or better score. Due to rounding, subscores may not total 100%.

Performance Task
Analysis & Problem Solving
Writing Effectiveness
Writing Mechanics

The table below shows students' mean scores on the three subscales that make up the Selected-Response Questions section of the CLA+. The students subscores are determined by the number of correct responses in each subsection, with those raw numbers adjusted based on the difficulty of the question set the students received. Individual student scores are rounded to the nearest whole number.

Subscale Mean Student Scores
Scientific & Quantitative Reasoning (Range: 200 to 800) 574.0
Critical Reading & Evaluation (Range: 200 to 800) 569.0
Critique an Argument (Range: 200 to 800) 566.0
Freshmen Detail

The charts below show the proportion of tested freshmen who scored at each level of the nine subscales that make up the CLA+. The subscale scores range from 1 to 6 with 6 representing a higher or better score. Due to rounding, subscores may not total 100%.

Performance Task
Analysis & Problem Solving
Writing Effectiveness
Writing Mechanics

The table below shows students' mean scores on the three subscales that make up the Selected-Response Questions section of the CLA+. The students subscores are determined by the number of correct responses in each subsection, with those raw numbers adjusted based on the difficulty of the question set the students received. Individual student scores are rounded to the nearest whole number.

Subscale Mean Student Scores
Scientific & Quantitative Reasoning (Range: 200 to 800) 527.0
Critical Reading & Evaluation (Range: 200 to 800) 521.0
Critique an Argument (Range: 200 to 800) 530.0