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University of North Dakota College Portrait

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University of North Dakota Learning Outcomes

Student learning is a valued and fundamental focus at the University of North Dakota. This is evident from the program-level assessments, gathered through departmental annual reporting, in which faculty describe their assessment practices within their majors.  A review process is in place where members of the University Assessment Committee (UAC) review both academic and non-academic units on a rotating basis.  At the end of the year, committee members hold a year-end Assessment Luncheon to provide an opportunity for a discussion of assessment findings involving the UAC members, department chairs, and deans. This year the luncheon featured brief presentations, from faculty representing some of the departments under review, describing successful assessment practices used in his or her home department.  http://und.edu/university-senate/committees/assessment/index.cfm

Essential Studies (ES) is the University of North Dakota’s program in general education.  ES courses are designed to help students develop key intellectual skills and competencies that are critical to doing successful work and service. http://und.edu/academics/essential-studies/ The ES Committee oversees a course “validation” or “revalidation” process that includes assessment of learning. Validation of a new course for ES requires identifying the ES goal that will be addressed in the course and submitting a plan for documenting the learning related to that goal. In addition to the validation progress, an annual cross-campus scoring session is held to review   student achievement of ES learning outcomes.  

Faculty and administrators involved with the First-Year (FY) Seminar pilot courses continue to collect information about student achievement of goals articulated for the FY Experience program. That information was the basis for affirming continued institutional commitment to the program and shaping planning for another round of seminar courses and assessments. 

Another group of faculty piloted classes in UND’s newly constructed SCALE-UP classroom, including planning for assessment of learning that occurs in that environment.  http://und.edu/scale-up/index.cfm   Assessment findings will inform planning for the development of such classrooms in the future.

At the institutional level, the Collegiate Learning Assessment (CLA) took place during the 2013-2014 academic year. This is the second time the CLA has been administered to a randomly selected group of freshmen and seniors.  Results from the 2009-2010 CLA indicated that UND senior scores resulted in “near expected” performance level for both the performance task and analytic task. In four of the five value-added scores the seniors recorded a positive score.  http://und.edu/research/institutional-research/_files/docs/newsletter-clip/clip-2010-cla.pdf

UND seniors, from the 2013-2014 CLA+, also performed "near expected" given the Entering Academic Ability of students enrolling at UND. http://und.edu/research/institutional-research/_files/docs/surveys/cla-13-14.pdf

Success upon graduation is evident in the extremely high pass rates on licensure and national examinations as well as high employment rates. http://und.edu/research/institutional-research/_files/docs/progress-report/2012.pdf Ninety-five percent of the respondents from the 2013-2014 First Destination Survey indicated being either employed or continuing in their education. http://und.edu/research/institutional-research/surveys/2014-employment.cfm




University of North Dakota administered the CLA+ in 2013 - 2014.

University of North Dakota conducted a Value-added administration of the CLA+ in 2013 - 2014. The results are displayed below in the SLO Results tab.

For additional information on UND’s process for administering CLA+, please click on the Assessment Process Tab below. For information on the students included in the administration, please click the Students Tested Tab.

Why did you choose the CLA+ for your institutional assessment?

After review and discussion of the various assessment tools, the University Assessment Committee recommended the CLA as it was the best fit for our campus.

 


Which University of North Dakota students are assessed? When?

A minimum of 100 freshmen and 100 seniors were tested.  Volunteers were recruited from the first-year experience courses as well as from capstones. They were provoded an information sheet explaining the CLA+. Student volunteers were provided several 2-hour sessions to sign up and then attend the testing. The testing was scheduled at two different computer labs.


How are assessment data collected?

Assessment results were collected from the freshmen and senior participants. Discussion and results from the 2013-2014 CLA+ can be viewed at http://und.edu/research/institutional-research/_files/docs/surveys/cla-13-14.pdf


How are data reported within University of North Dakota?

CLA results were reviewed by the University Assessment Committee and shared at various settings campus wide.  Results were also compiled, by college, and presented as a set of dashboards for the campus community.


How are assessment data at UND used to guide program improvements?

Findings from the recent administration of the Collegiate Learning Assessment were reviewed by faculty teams and members of the University Assessment Committee. Findings will help guide future program and service improvements.


Of 1869 freshmen students eligible to be tested, 109 (6%) were included in the tested sample at University of North Dakota.


Of 1181 senior students eligible to be tested, 101 (9%) were included in the tested sample at University of North Dakota.


Probability sampling, where a small randomly selected sample of a larger population can be used to estimate the learning gains in the entire population with statistical confidence, provides the foundation for campus-level student learning outcomes assessment at many institutions. It's important, however, to review the demographics of the tested sample of students to ensure that the proportion of students within a given group in the tested sample is close to the proportion of students in that group in the total population. Differences in proportions don't mean the results aren't valid, but they do mean that institutions need to use caution in interpreting the results for the groups that are under-represented in the tested sample.

Undergraduate Student Demographic Breakdown

  Freshmen Seniors
Eligible Students Tested Students Eligible Students Tested Students
Gender Female 45% 48% 54% 45%
Male 55% 52% 46% 56%
Other or Unknown <1% <1% <1% <1%
Race/
Ethnicity
US Underrepresented Minority 9% 6% 8% 5%
White / Caucasian 89% 91% 86% 90%
International 1% <1% 2% <1%
Unknown 1% 3% 4% 6%
Low-income (Eligible to receive a Federal Pell Grant) <1% <1% <1% <1%

Our tested participants included a higher proportion of females than exist in our student body. The participants also averaged a slightly lower ACT Composite score than what was reported institutionally. 

The VSA advises institutions to follow assessment publisher guidelines for determining the appropriate number of students to test. In the absence of publisher guidelines, the VSA provides sample size guidelines for institutions based on a 95% confidence interval and 5% margin of error. So long as the tested sample demographics represent the student body, this means we can be 95% certain that the "true" population learning outcomes are with +/- 5% of the reported results. For more information on Sampling, please refer to the Research Methods Knowledge Base

The increase in learning on the performance task is at or near what would be expected at an institution testing students of similar academic abilities.

The increase in learning on the selected-response questions is at or near what would be expected what would be epxected at an institution testing students of similar academic abilities.

Seniors Detail

The charts below show the proportion of tested seniors who scored at each level of the nine subscales that make up the CLA+. The subscale scores range from 1 to 6 with 6 representing a higher or better score. Due to rounding, subscores may not total 100%.

Performance Task
Analysis & Problem Solving
Writing Effectiveness
Writing Mechanics

The table below shows students' mean scores on the three subscales that make up the Selected-Response Questions section of the CLA+. The students subscores are determined by the number of correct responses in each subsection, with those raw numbers adjusted based on the difficulty of the question set the students received. Individual student scores are rounded to the nearest whole number.

Subscale Mean Student Scores
Scientific & Quantitative Reasoning (Range: 200 to 800) 564.0
Critical Reading & Evaluation (Range: 200 to 800) 547.0
Critique an Argument (Range: 200 to 800) 557.0
Freshmen Detail

The charts below show the proportion of tested freshmen who scored at each level of the nine subscales that make up the CLA+. The subscale scores range from 1 to 6 with 6 representing a higher or better score. Due to rounding, subscores may not total 100%.

Performance Task
Analysis & Problem Solving
Writing Effectiveness
Writing Mechanics

The table below shows students' mean scores on the three subscales that make up the Selected-Response Questions section of the CLA+. The students subscores are determined by the number of correct responses in each subsection, with those raw numbers adjusted based on the difficulty of the question set the students received. Individual student scores are rounded to the nearest whole number.

Subscale Mean Student Scores
Scientific & Quantitative Reasoning (Range: 200 to 800) 503.0
Critical Reading & Evaluation (Range: 200 to 800) 504.0
Critique an Argument (Range: 200 to 800) 501.0